Learn about the past. Prepare for your future.
Old World Map background

COURSES

Summer 2017 History Course Descriptions

SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE! Always check the University online schedule for the latest changes.


Session I - May 18 through June 21, 2017

image used for decoration only

HIS 206-01 - Topics in Premodern World History I: "Survey of the Premodern World"

ONLINE
Richard Shelton

This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic, South Asian, Chinese, and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in premodern world history.
Field: Europe. Markers: .GHP.GL.GPM


image used for decoration only

HIS 207-01 - Topics in Premodern World History I: "Cultures in Contact"

ONLINE
Sarah McCartney

This course provides a broad overview of world history in the premodern and early modern eras from roughly 500 C.E. to 1800 C.E.. It emphasizes connection, comparison, and change across Africa, Asia and South America, and highlights "big picture" moments that impacted the world population. Particular attention is given to commercial networks and the spread of religions and ideologies across the Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean, which brought cultures into contact.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .GHP.GN.GPM


image used for decoration only

HIS 209-01 - Topics in Modern World History II: "Social Movements in Modern World History"

ONLINE Brian Suttell

This course will emphasize social and political movements in world history from the late 18th century to the present, and analyze the historical conditions from which they arose. Topics will include (but are not limited to) independence movements in African and Asian nations, the Mexican Revolution and student movements in Mexico, the Cultural Revolution in China, the dismantling of apartheid in South Africa, and indigenous movements in Latin America. The course will also address the global connections of the civil rights movement in the United States. Students will interpret and analyze primary and secondary sources to create historical arguments.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .GHP.GMO.GN.IGS


image used for decoration only

HIS 211-01 - United States History to 1865

ONLINE 
Matthew Hintz

General survey of American history from colonization through the Civil War.
Field: United States. Markers: .GHP.GMO


image used for decoration only

HIS 212-01 - United States History since 1865

ONLINE 
Margaret Williams Carmack

General survey of American history from Reconstruction to the present.
Field: United States. Markers: GHP.GMO


image used for decoration only

HIS 216-01 - Civilizations of Asia

ONLINE 
Joseph Ross

Impact of West on Asia and Asia's response; development of nationalism and Communism. Focus is on India, China, and Japan in nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .GHP.GMO.GN.IGS


image used for decoration only

HIS 217-01 - The World in the Twentieth Century (1900-1945)

ONLINE 
Mark Moser

Political, social, and economic forces affecting Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. 1900-1945.
Field: Wider World. Markers: GHP.GMO.GN.IGS


HIS 335-01 - Moments of Crisis in Colonial America

image used for decoration only

Writing Intensive 
MTWR 10:10-12:10
Greg O'Brien

This course introduces students to the varieties of social crisis that took place in colonial North America. Of the dozens of such events in colonial America we will focus on four: Bacon's Rebellion (1670s Virginia), the Salem Witchcraft Trials (1690s New England), the Tuscarora War (1710s North Carolina), and the Stono Rebellion (1730s-40s South Carolina). Through these representative samples, students will learn about the issues and conditions that drove Puritans to accuse each other of witchcraft and condemned twenty people to die, Indians to resist colonial encroachment, African slaves to rebel against their enslavement, and indentured servants and small farmers to seek redress of their grievances through violent means. Colonial America was a place and time of dissension, disagreement, and violence in addition to the more familiar stories of colonial development, economic growth, and large-scale immigration.
Field: United States. Markers: .GMO.WI


image used for decoration only

HIS 347-01 - North Carolina History

ONLINE 
Christine Flood

History of North Carolina from its colonial origins to the twentieth century, including the evolution of its political system, economy, social structure, and culture.
Field: United States.


HIS 526-01 - Topics in the Civil War and Reconstruction: "The Transformation of American Nationalism"

image used for decoration only

Speaking Intensive

MTWR 2:30-4:30
Mark Elliott

This examines the topic of nationalism during the Civil War and Reconstruction. The Civil War was, among other things, a struggle to define nationhood and national identity. What were the contending formulations of nationhood before the war? How were these struggles resolved during Reconstruction? How was American nationalism transformed by the war? What were the lasting legacies of the war for American national and international power? Focusing on primary sources, this course explores answers to these questions by accessing the historical experiences of different historical figures. The clashing perspectives of specific individuals and well-defined groups will be emphasized, and through them students will come to a better understanding of the different ways in which American society as a whole was transformed by the upheaval of the war. Students undertake their own original research and present their findings to the class.​
Field: United States. Markers: .SI


Session II - June 22 through July 28, 2017

SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE! Always check the University online schedule for the latest changes.


Heraklion Archaeological Museum, Crete photo by Kristen Hellstrom, image used for decoration only

HIS 206-11 - Topics in Premodern World History I: "Mediterranean World"

ONLINE
Ian Michie

This class focuses on the history of the Mediterranean Sea from the origins of its earliest civilizations through the Middle Ages. The class will pay particular attention to the evolution and continuity of Mediterranean culture, society, and economic networks.
Field: Europe. Markers: .GHP.GL.GPM


image used for decoration only

HIS 209-11 - Topics in Modern World History I: "Awakening Giants: China and India"

ONLINE
Eric Oakley

Westerners tend to characterize China and India as "developing" or "third world" nations poised to “emerge” as twenty-first century superpowers. However, such terminology reinforces an inadequate "rise and fall" perspective often applied to Asian civilizations, common among humanities and social sciences until recent decades. Examining their histories since early modern times, this course inverts the traditional narrative to reconsider the contemporary states as giants awakening from a temporary period of instability and outside interference. Students will consider questions of China and India through a framework of "modernization." Students will examine a wealth of primary and secondary sources related to the development of both states, with close attention to the emergence of national ideologies. Historical themes will include Chinese and Indian empires, east-west encounters, foreign imperialism and colonization, statehood, and pressing contemporary issues.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .GHP.GL.GMO.IGS


image used for decoration only

HIS 211-11 - United States History to 1865

ONLINE 
Kelsey Walker

General survey of American history from colonization through the Civil War.
Field: United States. Markers: .GHP.GMO


image used for decoration only

HIS 212-11 - United States History since 1865

ONLINE 
Justina Licata

General survey of American history from Reconstruction to the present.
Field: United States. Markers: GHP.GMO


image used for decoration only

HIS 218-11 - The World in the Twentieth Century (1945-2000)

ONLINE 
Timothy Reagin

This class will examine global issues in the contemporary world, focusing mainly on the post-World War II period, from the dropping of atomic bombs on Japan in August 1945, to the complex, high-tech, evolving world of today. We will examine some of the important political, economic, social, and cultural changes of the second half of the twentieth century and how these changes have shaped the world we live in today.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .GHP.GMO.GN.IGS


image used for decoration only

HIS 222-11 - Europe 1400-1789

ONLINE 
Jason Stroud

Survey of major socio-economic, political, and cultural trends in Europe from the Renaissance to the French Revolution.
Field: Europe. Markers: .GHP.GL.GPM


image used for decoration only

HIS 329-11 - U.S. Women's History Since 1865

ONLINE 
Hannah Dudley Shotwell

A history of women in the U.S. since the Civil War. Topics include women's activism, labor, reproduction, public policy, race and class inequalities, and contemporary women's issues.
Field: United States. Markers: .WGS


image used for decoration only

HIS 344-11 - The New South

ONLINE 
Paige Meszaros

This course examines the social, political, and economic development of the American South from the Civil War to the present. Topics covered will include the Lost Cause; Jim Crow and the Black Freedom Movement; reform; changing labor patterns - including the effects of immigration; political and religious conservatism; and even leisure - from Nashville to NASCAR. Throughout the course, we will uncover conflicts over race, gender, and class differences; we will examine the role of the past in shaping the modern South; and we will try to determine the degree to which the South has changed. Finally, we will look at how the commodification of the southern way of life has influenced the rest of the nation.
Field: United States.


CAS home banner
Giving Banner
Facebook
Connect with us!