Learn about the past. Prepare for your future.
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COURSES

Fall 2015 Course Descriptions
200-400 Level

SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE! Always check the University online schedule for the latest changes.


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HIS 203-01 - History of Africa to 1870

89282 TR 9:30-10:45 Colleen Kriger

What is civilization? This course examines the variety of African civilizations throughout the continent, from ancient times up to the 19th century, and how closer study of African history has prompted scholars to revise the way "civilization" is defined. We will focus on ancient civilizations in Africa, the empires and city-states of the Islamic period, and the rise of trade with Europe, especially the Atlantic slave trade and its effects on African societies.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .AFS.GHP.GN.GPM.


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HIS 207 - "Islamic Civilization: From Mecca to the Crusades"

80255 207-01 TR 9:30-10:45 Asa Eger
80256 207-02 TR 11:00-12:15 Asa Eger

In the middle of the seventh century, Arab tribes coalesced and emerged from the Arabian Peninsula, conquering an enormous expanse of territory that reached from the shores of the Atlantic Ocean to the deserts of India in less than one hundred years. In the following centuries, Islamic civilization took shape, a dynamic process framed by Islamic ideals yet influenced by the many cultures this civilization embraced. The products of this civilization included magnificent monuments, extensive works of literature and science, far-flung trade routes that connected to east Asia, and new agricultural and technological innovations. This course will familiarize students with the history of the rise and spread of Islamic civilization as a complex and interdependent process that occurred throughout the Near East, North Africa, Spain, and Central Asia. We contextualize this process in the world before Islam and the rise of the Prophet Muhammad at the start of the seventh century and continue until the time of the Crusaders at the end of twelfth century. Our approach will be interdisciplinary. We will look at the history, art and architecture, archaeology, environment, literature, and religion of Islamic civilization.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .GHP.GN.GPM.IGS.


HIS 208-01 through -02 - "European Expansion & Empires"

MW 12:00-12:50 and F 12:00-12:50 or 1:00-1:50
Jill Bender

The lecture portion of this class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays at 12:00-12:50. Smaller discussion groups meet on Fridays at either 12:00-12:50 or 1:00-1:50.

80257 208-01 - MW 12-12:50, F 12-12:50
80588 208-02 - MW 12-12:50, F 1-1:50

This course surveys the rise and fall of European empires from the mid-eighteenth century to the late-twentieth century. From the Seven Years War to post-World War II decolonization, we will examine methods of expansion as well as resistance to imperialism. Particular attention will be paid to the social, cultural, and political repercussions of empires and imperial contact.
Field: Europe. Markers: .GHP.GL.GMO.


HIS 208-03 - "European Expansion & Empires"

87607 MWF 10:00-10:50 Jill Bender

This course surveys the rise and fall of European empires from the mid-eighteenth century to the late-twentieth century. From the Seven Years War to post-World War II decolonization, we will examine methods of expansion as well as resistance to imperialism. Particular attention will be paid to the social, cultural, and political repercussions of empires and imperial contact.
Field: Europe. Markers: .GHP.GL.GMO.


HIS 208-04 - "Freedom and Revolution in Modern World History"

88155 TR 3:30-4:45 Brian Suttell

This course will address political and social revolutions from the late 18th century to the present, and will approach European history from a global perspective. Topics include (but are not limited to) political and economic revolutions such as those in North America, France, and Russia, as well as independence movements in Africa and India. The course will also examine social movements such as the abolitionist movement and the Congo Reform movement. Students will analyze varying conceptions of freedom in different cultures, and the impact of globalization in shaping a new discourse on human rights.
Field: Europe. Markers: .GHP.GL.GMO.


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HIS 208-05 - "Revolutions in Modern World History"

88158 ONLINE Mark Moser

This course will be a comparative overview of major "revolutions" in modern world history. Topics covered will include the Scientific Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the Technological Revolution of the late 20th century, as well as important political and cultural revolutions that have taken place globally in the modern era. Major emphasis will be placed on the impact of these revolutions on the individual..
Field: Europe. Markers: .GHP.GL.GMO.


HIS 209-01 - "Women in Modern World History"

89283 ONLINE Lisa Levenstein

This course will introduce students to major themes in the study of women and world history since 1750. Paying particular attention to themes of labor and politics, we will explore how women's experiences changed over time and differed according to location. Students will learn how to analyze a variety of primary sources and evaluate historical debates. They will consider how looking at women and gender changes our understanding of major topics in world history and sheds light on contemporary global politics.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .GHP.GMO.GN.WGS.


HIS 209-02 - "Global Civil and Human Rights"

89284 MW 3:30-4:45 Virginia Summey

This course will examine civil and human rights around the world in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will discuss the evolution of "humanitarianism" and "human rights" in an international perspective, as well as movements aimed to promote the civil rights of individuals based on race, gender, religion, or nationality. Some topics addressed will include (but not be limited to) slavery in the British Empire and the United States, imperialism and self-determination, genocide, women's movements, reform movements, apartheid, and segregation and racial civil rights in the U.S. Students will learn how to analyze primary sources and examine how these events have shaped global politics.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .GHP.GMO.GN.


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HIS 211-01 through -06 - United States History to 1865

MW 10:00-10:50 and F 10:00-10:50 or 11:00-11:50
Mark Elliott

General survey of American history from colonization through the Civil War.
Field: United States. Markers: .GHP.GMO.WI. All sections are Writing Intensive.

The lecture portion of this class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays at 10:00-10:50. Smaller discussion groups meet on Fridays at either 10:00-10:50 or 11:00-11:50.

80264 211-01 - MW 10-10:50, F 10-10:50
80265 211-02 - MW 10-10:50, F 10-10:50
80266 211-03 - MW 10-10:50, F 10-10:50
86067 211-04 - MW 10-10:50, F 11-11:50
89285 211-05 - MW 10-10:50, F 11-11:50
89286 211-06 - MW 10-10:50, F 11-11:50


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HIS 212-01 - United States History since 1865

General survey of American history from Reconstruction to the present.
Field: United States. Markers: GHP.GMO

80294 212-01 TR 9:30-10:45 Charles Bolton

89287 212-02 TR 3:30-4:45 Thomas Jackson

89288 212-03 MWF 9:00-9:50 Ethan Moore

89711 212-04 TR 2:00-3:15 Christopher Graham


HIS 216-01 - Civilizations of Asia

89290 MWF 10:00-10:50 Joseph Ross

This course touches on key moments in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will pay close attention to the growth of nationalism, industrialization, and communism, how Asia became "modern," the impact Europe and the United States had on the region, and the development of human rights. Students will examine primary sources and practice the skills historians use in order to make sense of the past.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .GHP.GMO.GN.IGS


HIS 217 - The World of the Twentieth Century (1900-1945)

Political, social, and economic forces affecting Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. 1900-1945.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .GHP.GMO.GN.

80315 217-01 TR 11:00-12:15 Hannah Dudley Shotwell

87609 217-02 MWF 11:00-11:50 Mark Moser

87610 217-03 ONLINE Marjorie Foy


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HIS 218-01 through -04: The World of the Twentieth Century (1945-2000)

MW 9:00-9:50 and F 9:00-9:50 or F 10:00-10:50
Jeff Jones

This class will examine global issues in the contemporary world, focusing mainly on the post-World War II period, from the dropping of atomic bombs on Japan in August 1945, to the complex, high-tech, evolving world of today. We will examine some of the important political, economic, social, and cultural changes of the second half of the twentieth century and how these changes have shaped the world we live in today.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .GHP.GMO.GN.IGS.

The lecture portion of this class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays at 9:00-9:50. Smaller discussion groups meet on Fridays at either 9:00-9:50 or 10:00-10:50..

86070 218-01 - MW 9-9:50, F 9-9:50
89291 218-02 - MW 9-9:50, F 9-9:50
89292 218-03 - MW 9-9:50, F 10-10:50
89293 218-04 - MW 9-9:50, F 10-10:50


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HIS 220-01 - The Ancient World

85316 TR 12:30-1:45 Stephen Ruzicka

Early civilizations: Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman to Reign of Constantine.
Field: Europe. Markers: .ARC.GHP.GPM.


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HIS 221 - Medieval Legacy

Survey of Western European history from the end of the Roman Empire to the fifteenth century exploring such varied aspects of the medieval experience as pilgrimage, crusade, peasant life, the emergence of national states, and the rise of the university.
Field: Europe. Markers:.GHP.GL.GPM.

HIS 221-01 through -02

MW 10:00-10:50 and F 10:00-10:50 or F 11:00-11:50
Rick Barton

The lecture portion of this class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays at 10:00-10:50. Smaller discussion groups meet on Fridays at either 10:00-10:50 or 11:00-11:50..

87769 221-01 - MW 10-10:50, F 10-10:50
89294 221-02 - MW 10-10:50, F 11-11:50

HIS 221-03 - Medieval Legacy

89471 TR 11:00-12:15 Caitlin Saraphis


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HIS 222-01 through -02 - Europe 1400-1789

MW 11:00-11:50 and F 11:00-11:50 or F 12:00-12:50
Jodi Bilinkoff

Survey of major socio-economic, political, and cultural trends in Europe from the Renaissance to the French Revolution.
Field: Europe. Markers:.GHP.GL.GPM.

The lecture portion of this class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays at 11:00-11:50. Smaller discussion groups meet on Fridays at either 11:00-11:50 or 12:00-12:50..

80320 222-01 - MW 11-11:50, F 11-11:50
89295 222-02 - MW 11-11:50, F 12-12:50


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HIS 223-01 - European Revolutions, 1789-1989

80321 TR 3:30-4:45 Susan Thomas

A survey of the political, social, and cultural history of Europe from the time of the French Revolution to the present with emphasis on the emergence of political ideologies and categories of inclusion and exclusion in the boundaries of Europe.
Field: Europe. Markers:.GHP.GL.GMO.


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HIS 239-01 - The First America: Latin America, 1492-1830

MWF 11:00-11:50
Peter Villella

Introduction to the early history of Latin America. Emphasis on the clash of cultures, Indian-Spanish relations, and the structure and mechanisms of empire.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .GHP.GMO.GN.IGS.


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HIS 301 - Race and Slavery

89297 TR 2:00-3:15 Watson Jennison

An examination of the African-American experience from ancient to modern times, including precolonial Africa, the Atlantic slave trade, slavery in the Americas with special emphasis on the United States before the Civil War.
Field: United States. Markers: .AFS.GMO


HIS 308 - Navigating World History

80556 TR 9:30-10:45 Steven Ruzicka

Pr. Social Studies Licensure candidates or permission of instructor

Introduction to and overview of world history, ca. 8000 B.C.E. to the present. Prepares Social Studies Licensure majors to teach world history at the middle grades and high school level.
Field: Wider World.


image used for decoration onlyHIS 315 - Witchcraft and Magic in European History

89298 MW 2:00-3:15 Jodi Bilinkoff

Examination of witchcraft beliefs and persecution as a way of studying the social history of Europe before industrialization. Emphasizes the "Witch Craze" of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
Field: Europe.


HIS 316 - Interpreting American History

80557 TR 12:30-1:45 Thomas Jackson

Pr. Middle Grades or Secondary Social Studies Licensure candidates or permission of instructor

Examination of a broad variety of primary source evidence and historiographical methods for studying the American past from the colonial era through the twentieth century.
Field: United States.


HIS 321 - Latin America and the United States

87767 MW 2:00-3:15 Peter Villella

A history of inter-American relations from the Monroe Doctrine to the Caribbean Basin Initiative. An examination of traditional interpretations and contemporary arguments and the Latin American context and perspective.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .IGS


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HIS 329 - U.S. Women's History since 1865

89299 T 6:00-8:50 p.m. Justina Licata

This course examines women's impact on U.S. history from 1865 to the present. The course materials break down the traditional and simplistic waves analogy often used to represent women's history, demonstrating the complexities of women's experiences and activism. Some topics covered in this class include, Ida B. Wells impact on the anti-lynching campaign, the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire in New York City, Alice Paul and her work as a radical suffragist, and Betty Friedan's role in changing gender roles and ideals in the second half of the twentieth century.
Field: United States. Marker: WGS.


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HIS 333 - American Indian History to 1840

80559 TR 3:30-4:45 Jamie Mize

This course explores the history of American Indians in the area now encompassed by the United States through the era of Indian Removal in the 1830s, with particular emphasis on: the Northeast, the Southeast, the Midwest, and the Southwest. In each region, we will focus on the changes and continuities in Native cultures, social structures, and political configurations. This course will introduce students to the practice of "ethnohistory" (a combination of history and anthropology). As ethnohistorians, we will pay particular attention to the lifeways of the individual Native groups highlighted in this course and apply their worldviews to the historical narrative we discuss.
Field: Wider World.


HIS 337 - Age of Jefferson and Jackson, 1789-1848

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89491 MWF 1:00-1:50 Mark Moser

A study of American History, 1789-1848, including examination of political events and politicians, economic and social trends and developments, and growth of sectionalism.
Field: United States.


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HIS 341 - Pirates of the Caribbean

85597 TR 11:00-12:15 Linda Rupert

Few historical actors have been so thoroughly romanticized - or so completely decontextualized - as Caribbean pirates. This course introduces students to the fascinating, complex, and changing role of corsairs, buccaneers, pirates, and privateers in shaping the emerging colonial economies, societies, and cultures of the early modern Caribbean. From the daring exploits of the French corsairs and the Elizabethan privateers in the 1500s, to the independent buccaneer communities of the 1600s, to the gruesome trials and hangings of pirate outlaws in the early 1700s, piracy was intricately woven into the history of the region.
Field: Wider World.


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HIS 347 - History of North Carolina

80562 347-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Christine Flood (Speaking Intensive Section)

89860 347-02 ONLINE Jason Stroud

This is a survey course. It spans more than 400 years of state history - from colonization to the present. It is American history with the spotlight on North Carolina. Objectives of the course include an examination of:

  • when, how, and why North Carolina developed as it did.
  • How its actions and reactions were similar or different from the other states.
  • How the development of its economic, social, and political structure determines present-day North Carolina with special emphasis on such topics as: a) the economy b) politics c) race relations.
Field: United States.


HIS 351 - History of Greece, 2000 b.c. - 31 b.c.

89301 TR 2:00-3:15 Stephen Ruzicka

Mycenaean society, Greek "dark ages," colonization and tyranny, Athens and Sparta, flowering in the fifth and fourth centuries, conquests of Alexander, Hellenistic empires, and the diffusion of Greek civilization.
Field: Europe.


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HIS 383 - Chinese History to 1800

89303 TR 12:30-1:45 Jamie Anderson

The Western world's interest in China has long followed two paths, one material and one spiritual. While Western traders and government leaders debated various routes to the elusive "China Market," artists and philosophers deliberated tenets of Confucianism, Daoism (Taoism) and Buddhism, the schools of thought that flourished in traditional Chinese society. The end result was a representation of China still popular in the West, as full of Western dreams and ambitions as it is of Chinese realities. The current debates regarding Chinese trading privileges and human rights abuses are clearly shaped by this Western profile of China. Our course will hold up this picture to scrutiny, while introducing and illuminating both the remarkable and the commonplace from China's past.
Field: Wider World.


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HIS 389 - West Africa during the Atlantic Slave Trade

89304 TR 12:30-1:45 Colleen Kriger

How, why, and when did trade between Europeans and Africans along Africa's western coast become a trade in slaves across the Atlantic to the Americas? This course examines the history of this trade, how it was organized and carried out on the African side of the Atlantic, and how the slave trade and its abolition affected African societies.
Field: Wider World. Markers: .AFS.IGS


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HIS 390 - History Internship

Field learning experience in public or applied history. Academic supervision provided by job supervisor. Assigned reading and written reports. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of Director of Public History.


HIS 391 - Historical Skills and Methods

83599 MW 2:00-3:15 Jeff Jones
Research Intensive. Restricted to history majors.

This is a required course for all history majors (except social studies concentration candidates who complete HIS 430 for research methods). It serves as a prerequisite for the capstone course in the major. Our first goal is to outline and practice a set of skills which students can take with them to other upper-level history classes, and especially to History 511. Among these skills are the following: 1) producing feasible research questions and topics from the reading of primary and secondary sources; 2) becoming familiar with the main categories of (and attributes of) primary sources pertinent to a topic; 3) becoming familiar with the locations and/or databases in which these sources can be accessed; 4) analyzing primary sources as texts, and not merely as data-mines (i.e., asking who? When? Where? Why?); 5) identifying the arguments of secondary sources and evaluating those arguments; and more.


HIS 393 - Medieval Church and State

89305 TR 9:30-10:45 Richard Barton

This course is about the practice and theory of politics in the Middle Ages. We will proceed along two parallel courses: first, we will look at a series of particularly dramatic and influential political confrontations in the period between 300 and 1500 (including the Investiture Contest, the murder of Thomas Becket, the struggle between Philip the Fair and Boniface VIII, the fierce debate over Franciscan poverty, and the Hundred Years War). Second, we will use those examples to explore the political legacy left to us by the Middle Ages. In other words, we'll want to investigate what these confrontations meant in terms of the growth of political institutions and political thought. While this is not a course devoted primarily to the history of ideas, we will take care to notice the growth of particularly medieval (and modern?) ideas concerning jurisdiction, sovereignty, the state, and the body politic. Since the Middle Ages witnessed a significant conflict between secular and ecclesiastical opinion on many of these issues, we will use the points of conflict between secular and religious authorities as the stepping stone for this sort of broader analysis of political events. No prior knowledge of the Middle Ages is necessary.
Field: Europe. Marker: .GL


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